Leonardo DiCaprio showed the magnitude of the Repsol oil spill in the Ventanilla Sea

Leonardo DiCaprio posted on his Instagram account about the oil spill in the Ventanilla sea.  REUTERS/Mike Blake/File
Leonardo DiCaprio posted on his Instagram account about the oil spill in the Ventanilla sea. REUTERS/Mike Blake/File

Actor and environmental activist Leonardo Dicaprio spoke about the ecological tragedy caused by 6,000 barrels of oil from Repsol’s La Pampilla refinery, in the sea of ​​Ventanilla, which is having repercussions on other beaches along the coast.

Through his Instagram account, the Oscar winner reported what had happened so far to his more than 52 million followers. The publication was accompanied by a video of Now This about the oil spill that has caused the contamination of beaches and the death of various marine species, as has been reported in associations for the defense of animals.

“Drone footage showed black mud covering Peru’s golden beach following an oil spill on January 16 caused by the Tonga volcanic eruption. Mud from a discharge ship buffeted by unusually high waves contaminated at least 1.2 miles along the coast and two beaches., wrote in the caption of the image.

The publication of Leonardo Dicaprio, of 37 seconds, was applauded by the users while the Peruvian followers thanked him for the gesture of making visible what is happening on the national coast.

The artist was named a messenger of peace in the priority area of ​​climate change before the 2014 Climate Summit and has now joined the voices about the oil spill caused by Repsol.

A dead bird lies on a beach during a cleanup after an oil spill caused by freak waves, triggered by a huge underwater volcanic eruption half a world away, in Tonga, in Ventanilla, Peru.  January 18, 2022. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares
A dead bird lies on a beach during a cleanup after an oil spill caused by freak waves, triggered by a huge underwater volcanic eruption half a world away, in Tonga, in Ventanilla, Peru. January 18, 2022. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares

DICAPRIO, THE ACTIVIST

Leonardo Dicaprio He has openly worked for the defense of the environment since he began his career. In 1998, at the age of 24, created the foundation that bears his name to preserve the last wild places on earth and seek solutions to protect nature.

Jack Dawson’s interpreter in the film titanica always seeks the conservation of forests and oceans with donations, public campaigns and environmental projects.

The artist, named a messenger of peace by the United Nations (UN), supports more than 35 conservation projects around the world to protect endangered species and fragile ecosystems.

In 2021, DiCaprio donated $43 million to seek restoration in the Galapagos Islands, a 1978 World Heritage Site by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (Unesco).

On that occasion he announced the launch of Re:wild, an environmental organization that seeks to protect wildlife and restore biodiversity, which he founded together with a group of scientists.

OIL SPILL AFFECTS ARTISAN FISHERMEN

More than 1,500 artisanal fishermen and their families are being affected by the Repsol oil spill in the Peruvian sea, according to the Committee for the Sustainable Management of the Giant Squid of the South Pacific (Calamasur), an organization that brings together industrialists and artisanal fishermen.

Alfonso Miranda, head of Calamasur, said that there is a “economic damage for those families who live day by day from their artisanal fishing activities” and added that it is possibly the most serious accident in the marine environment in the Peruvian capital.

The president of the committee also indicated that not only artisanal fishing is being affected, but also tourism and other recreational activities that are sources of economic income for people who work on the beaches.

Until now, the fishermen they can only fish 10% of what was achieved before the ecological tragedy caused by Repsol last weekend.

KEEP READING

Shocking photographs that record the magnitude of the Repsol oil spill on the Peruvian coast
Damage to the ecosystem: the animals affected by the Repsol oil spill in Ventanilla
Repsol could receive a fine of US$ 34 million for an oil spill on the Peruvian coast

Source link

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Back to top button

Adblock Detected

Please consider supporting us by disabling your ad blocker